Friday, March 9, 2012

Silas W. Cobb


I would like to introduce you to my fourth great-grandfather, Silas W. Cobb. Today he resides in the Northfield Oakwood Cemetery located in Northbrook, Illinois.



The gravestone of Silas W. Cobb reports that he passed away on 13 April 1852 at seventy-five years of age.  This suggests that Silas W. Cobb was born about 1777. My heart beat faster with this discovery because he could be my one and only link to the American Revolution!

The surname Cobb was a new name in my tree and required careful research. I have many questions about this gentleman and will need to travel to Vermont to find the answers. The 1820 and 1830 census records show Silas W. Cobb living in Moretown, Vermont and Montpelier, Vermont; respectively. Back in the day, census takers reported heads of household and tallied the household members by age, sex, free or slave, and colored or white.

On 7 August 1820 the Silas W. Cobb household of Moretown, Vermont looked like this:

Free White Persons – Males – Under 10:                2
Free White Persons – Males – 10 thru 15:               2
Free White Persons – Males – 26 thru 44:               1
Free White Persons – Females – Under 10:             3
Free White Persons – Females – 10 thru 15:            2
Free White Persons – Females – 16 thru 25:            2
Free White Persons – Females – 26 thru 44:            1           
Number of Persons – Engaged in Agriculture:         1
Total Free White Persons:                                       13

In 1830 the Silas W. Cobb household of Montpelier, Vermont looked like this:

Free White Persons – Males - 20 thru 29:                 3
Free White Persons – Males – 50 thru 60:                1
Free White Persons – Females – 10 thru 14:            1
Free White Persons – Females – 15 thru 19:            1
Free White Persons – Females – 20 thru 29:            3
Free White Persons – Females – 30 thru 39:            1
Total Free White Persons:                                       10

Who were these people? What were their names? How did a man living in Vermont end up buried in Illinois? There is so much to learn and so much to tell. Tune in to my next post for a little more of the story.

Linda

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